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On February 9, 2017, Seyfarth Shaw hosted a signal event regarding workplace class action litigation in 2016 and the implications for employers looking to anticipate and prepare for workplace trends in 2017.

Vickie Lipnic, the newly appointed Acting Chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, joined Jerry Maatman in launching Seyfarth’s 2017 Workplace Class Action

th9L3810CUSeyfarth Synopsis: Following a major victory for an airline-industry employer over the EEOC in a Title VII action regarding religious accommodations, the Court denied the EEOC’s motion for a new trial. The decision is a blueprint for employers on turning the tables on the Commission’s litigation tactics.

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After the EEOC brought an action alleging

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Seyfarth Synopsis:  The EEOC sued an employer for Equal Pay Act violations, claiming that Maryland Insurance Administration failed to pay three female fraud investigators the same wages as comparable male fraud investigators. On cross motions for summary judgment, the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland denied the EEOC’s motion and granted summary

medical-1006787_960_720Seyfarth Synopsis: In an ADA action regarding disability discrimination, the Fifth Circuit reversed a District Court’s grant of summary judgment in favor of the employer and against the EEOC, noting that even though the charging party indicated she had a temporary total disability on a disability insurance claim form that she submitted the day after

thKCD34Y33By Gerald L. Maatman, Jr. and Alex W. Karasik

Seyfarth Synopsis: In an EEOC religious discrimination case, a federal court found that “Onionhead” was a religion for purposes of Title VII.   The court also found that the EEOC did not fail to meet its Title VII pre-suit duties when it added to its lawsuit seven

thPBYES7VQSeyfarth Synopsis: After the EEOC brought an action under the Americans With Disabilities Act against an employer who implemented a wellness program requiring employees to take a health assessment to participate, the Court granted the employer’s motion for summary judgment and denied the EEOC’s motion for summary judgment after finding that the program was voluntary.

wiflagBy Gerald L. Maatman, Jr. and Alex W. Karasik

Seyfarth Synopsis: Court denied employer’s motion for summary judgment in EEOC race and/or national origin discrimination case involving the termination of non-English speaking employees.

In EEOC v. Wisconsin Plastics, Inc., No. 14-C-663 (E.D. Wis. May 5, 2016), the EEOC brought an action alleging discrimination