By Gerald L. Maatman, Jr. and Lauren E. Becker

Seyfarth Synopsis: The U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey recently issued a ruling with respect to Defendants’ “compelling” exhaustion argument that Plaintiffs failed to exhaust administrative remedies with respect to their disparate treatment and disparate impact theories of Title VII claims relied on

By Gerald L. Maatman, Jr. and Alex W. Karasik

Seyfarth SynopsisAfter a federal district court dismissed the EEOC’s unlawful-interference claim against a private college that had sued a former employee for allegedly breaching a settlement agreement by filing an EEOC charge, the Tenth Circuit reversed the dismissal of the EEOC’s unlawful-interference claim, citing

By Gerald L. Maatman, Jr. and Kathryn “Chris” Palamountain

A recent Texas Court of Appeals case involving claims of human trafficking of workers recruited in the Philippines and brought to work in Texas provides insight into how principles of international comity may be applied in Texas state courts in the class action context. This ruling

By Gerald L. Maatman, Jr.

On September 22, 2014, in EEOC v. Vicksburg Healthcare LLC, et al., Case No. 3:13-CV-895 (S.D. Miss. Sept. 22, 2014), Judge Keith Starrett the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi granted defendant’s motion to dismiss an EEOC lawsuit for lack of personal jurisdiction and insufficient service

wdwas.jpgBy Gerald L. Maatman, Jr. and Jennifer A. Riley

On June 6, 2013, Judge Benjamin H. Settle of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington issued an opinion in Canada v. Meracord, LLC, No. 12-5657 (W.D. Wash. June 6, 2012), and denied defendants’ motion to dismiss plaintiff’s claims. 

In a cursory opinion