By Gerald L. Maatman, Jr., Pamela Q. Devata, and John Drury

Seyfarth Synopsis:  On June 25, 2021, the U.S. Supreme Court reversed the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in TransUnion LLC v. Ramirez, No. 20-297 (U.S. June 25, 2021).  The Supreme Court held that the vast majority of class members did

By Gerald L. Maatman, Jr.

Seyfarth Synopsis: In our continuing coverage of the top trends found in Seyfarth’s 2021 Workplace Class Action Litigation Report, in 2020, government enforcement litigation slowed considerably. Although the value of government enforcement settlements went up, agencies like the EEOC downsized their litigation enforcement programs and brought fewer lawsuits in 2020

By Gerald L. Maatman, Jr., Pamela Q. Devata, & Robert T. Szyba

Seyfarth Synopsis: Following remand from the U.S. Supreme Court, the Ninth Circuit found that the plaintiff suing Spokeo, Inc. under the Fair Credit Reporting Act alleged sufficient injury to establish standing to proceed in federal court and to proceed with his

supreme courtSeyfarth Synopsis: As profiled in our recent publication of the 13th Annual Workplace Class Action Litigation Report, the U.S. Supreme Court’s rulings have a profound impact on employers and the tools they may utilize to defend high-stakes litigation. Rulings by the Supreme Court in 2016 were no exception.

Is The Supreme Court Pro-Worker Or

imagesBy Pam Devata, John Drury, and Robert Szyba

On March 13, 2015, the Solicitor General of the United States filed an amicus brief opposing the petition for writ of certiorari filed in Spokeo, Inc. v. Robins, No. 13-1339 (U.S.). The Spokeo petition poses a question with a significant impact on the future

By Pamela Q. Devata and Kendra K. Paul

On December 2, 2013, the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania opined on when employers’ deficient disclosures can make them liable under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”) in Reardon v. ClosetMaid Corporation, No. 2:08-CV-01730, 2013 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 169821 (W.D. Pa. Dec.

By Pamela Devata and Reema Kapur

The refrain from the Rolling Stones’ iconic song “Satisfaction” reportedly was inspired by a phrase from a Chuck Berry ditty “I can’t get no satisfaction from the judge….”  This phrase aptly describes the outcome for a defendant seeking to dismiss putative class claims under the Fair Credit Reporting Act